Hi,

I work for Live Magazine at the Mail on Sunday in London, and am looking for some research help on a visualisation project (for print, not web), for which we are willing to pay if necessary.

I am looking for a way to collate tables of historical exchange rates between all the world's currencies and the British Pound for the last four years (since Jan 2007). I am looking to produce a visualisation showing the relative performances of different currencies throughout the financial crisis. In order to eliminate problems of scale (ie, one currency being worth hundreds of times less than the pound, one worth nearly the same) I would like to represent this in terms of percentage change over time.

I know that the data for the basic historical rates exists at oanda.com (http://www.oanda.com/currency/historical-rates-classic?srccont=rightnav) but it would be incredibly time-consuming to collect. I'm not a programmer, or at all code-literate, so if someone knows a quick way to do this that would be amazing. The data gives daily values - for my purposes, weekly would suffice, but I don't know how easy that is. Similarly, a number of extinct currencies are listed - I would need to be able to weed them out from the data.

Let me know if you think you can help - all advice and assistance would be much appreciated. Anything that's not clear just ask and I'll get back to you.

Thanks

Chris Hall

christopher.hall(at)mailonsunday.co.uk

asked 21 Feb '11, 14:43

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Chris Hall
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The Bank of Canada has the option to get 10 year rates in CSV and XML format here:

http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/rates/exchform.html

Also monthly and annual averages

link

answered 22 Feb '11, 15:15

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pallih
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edited 22 Feb '11, 18:53

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rgrp ♦♦
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From the terms of use of the site;

PERSONAL AND NON-COMMERCIAL USE. Unless otherwise specified, the Web Site is for your personal and non-commercial use. You may not modify, copy, distribute, display, perform, reproduce, publish, license, create derivative works from, transfer, retransmit, or sell any information, software, products or services obtained from the Web Site. You may not use any computerized or automatic mechanism, including without limitation, any Web scraper, spider or robot, to access, extract and/or download any information, including without limitation, any currency exchange data, from the Web Site.

The data is, sadly, not open.

There's a spreadsheet on a New Zealand gov site; with pound, USD, Austrailian Dollar, Yen and Euro: http://www.rbnz.govt.nz/statistics/exandint/b1/index.html

link

answered 22 Feb '11, 01:36

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Christopher ...
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Suggest using US Fed Reserve Exchange Rate Data. See this CKAN package: http://ckan.net/package/econ-fred

And, in particular, these data series: http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/categories/15

link

answered 22 Feb '11, 18:53

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Asked: 21 Feb '11, 14:43

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Last updated: 22 Feb '11, 18:53

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