When researching some lifestyle conditions, valuable information can be gleaned by analysing gedcom data (GEDCOM is a 'open' proprietary standard for genealogical data).

Are there any large gedcom data stores that are available to the general public?

For more information about GEDCOM see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gedcom

asked 19 Jan '11, 06:18

OldvicP's gravatar image

OldvicP
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edited 23 Jan '11, 17:21

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rgrp ♦♦
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What is "gedcom"? For searching on this question, may be worth elaborating a little?

(19 Jan '11, 10:30) psychemedia ♦♦

At the end of my question, I added a link to the wikipedia page on gedocm.

(19 Jan '11, 11:28) OldvicP

You can try searching Google for all Gedcom files. This will return some 20k files, but caveat emptor wrt reliability and licensing.

By "available to the general public", I assume you are looking for something under an Open License (Open Database License or similar). Most Gedcom files I know of, including those found with the above mentioned Google search, will not be available under a suitable license.

However, if you're just looking for large open stores of data on people (rather than the Gedcom format particularly) you may wish to take a look at Freebase which has some 1.8M+ people in its database. It's not in Gedcom format, but has a powerful API and all its 330M+ facts are available for bulk download under a CC-By license.

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This answer is marked "community wiki".

answered 20 Jan '11, 10:23

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Open Rights Group's Open Data Campaign is working on supporting FreeBMD to get more genealogical data available and might be worth exploring / getting in touch with.

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answered 22 Jan '11, 10:35

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Tim Davies
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OldvicP,

You might also check out Familypedia (a semantic wiki for genealogy). Are you looking for exportable genealogical data or just freely available data? Because FamilySearch has always had enormous datasets and indexed scans.

FYI: I'm part of a new standards group working on a new open standard for genealogical data. We're looking at XML as way of expressing the model, but it's still rather early along in the process. Check out the project at

OpenGen.org

Cheers,

Tod

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answered 21 Jan '11, 02:49

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Many thanks IainSproat & Tod. I'm looking for large amounts of free and exportable data. In general material on which to experiment with pattern matching crawlers - this to correlate with other historical data. Gedcom and XML would be fine. Your (plural) leads are just the ticket.

link

answered 20 Jan '11, 13:38

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OldvicP
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edited 21 Jan '11, 18:04

Thanks Tim! I'll contact them ASAP.

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answered 23 Jan '11, 03:15

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Asked: 19 Jan '11, 06:18

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